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Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels. found in the catalog.

Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels.

G. H. Cook

Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels.

by G. H. Cook

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  • 20 Currently reading

Published by John Baker in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

This ed. orig. publ., Phoenix House, 1963.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13806395M

The Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin was built by the townspeople of Wakefield in the mid 14th century as an integral part of Wakefield's new stone bridge (which replaced earlier wooden bridges) across the River Calder. It was first licensed in TOPOGRAPHY AUSTIN John D Merevale Church and Abbey Paperback Date of Pub: ISBN: Story book account of the city and its buildings. Lavishly illustrated. Mediaeval Chantries and Chantry Chapels Hardback Date of Pub: ISBN: N/A Publisher: Phoenix House Limited.

  The church was very richly endowed with chantries and chapels and altars. In John de Tours founded a chantry there, which he endowed with a considerable amount of land; and in Simon de Islip, Archbishop of Canterbury, handsomely endowed another. In all there are said to have been four chantries. The original medieval Chantry woodland was mainly in the south-west, near the former gamekeeper’s cottage, which was built in by Henry Edmund Austen of Shalford House. Game was an important source of income to the landowner: the interests of the tenant leasing the sporting rights and the bailiff trying to protect the tree plantations.

The Chantry Chapel of St Michael and the Holy Souls, Walsingham Chantry chapels were also associated with almshouses and schools. For instance, many wealthy pious benefactors founded grammar schools whose pupils were taught by chantry priests who would pray for the founder’s soul. Although the Chantries Acts of and , which. Mediaeval Chantries and Chantry Chapels Phoenix House Limited, , hardback On different types of chantries, their origin and purpose; with descriptions of surviving examples in cathedrals, monasteries and parish churches; illustrated with photographs and plans. COSMAN, Madelaine Pelner Medieval Holidays and Festivals: a calendar of celebrationsFile Size: KB.


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Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels by G. H. Cook Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Cook, George Henry. Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels. London: Phoenix House, (OCoLC) COVID Resources.

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Mediaeval Chantries and Chantry Chapels Hardcover – January 1, by G. Cook (Author) See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ — $ Author: G. Cook. The chantry -- a special, often private, chapel within a church dedicated to a particular benefactor or benefactor's family, where prayers for the benefactor's soul were said -- was probably the most common, and also one of the most distinctive, of all late medieval religious foundations.

These structures, although much altered with time, are still a very noticeable feature of many late Reviews: 1. A chantry may occupy a single altar, for example in the side aisle of a church, rather than an enclosed chapel within a larger church, generally dedicated to the donor's favourite saint.

Many chantry altars became richly endowed, often with gold furnishings and valuable vestments. Over the centuries, chantries increased in embellishments, often. Buy Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels Revised Edition by Cook, George Henry (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : George Henry Cook. The chantry -- a special, often private, chapel within a church dedicated to a particular benefactor or benefactor's family, where prayers for the benefactor's soul were said -- was probably the most common, and also one of the most distinctive, of all late medieval religious foundations.

Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels / G.H. Cook by G. (George Henry) Cook and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   York cathedral shows virtually no signs of the existence of chantry chapels or shrines, although there is documentary evidence for as many as sixty altars, dedicated to a bewildering variety of saints and often serving as multiple chantries.

agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be Cited by: 1. The chantry -- a special, often private, chapel within a church dedicated to a particular benefactor or benefactor's family, where prayers for the benefactor's soul were said -- was probably the most common, and also one of the most distinctive, of all late medieval religious by: 2.

Page 24 of note 2 This estimate includes several chantries about which little or nothing is known except for the appearance of a licence for alienation in mortmain on the royal patent rolls.

The York evidence therefore leads to a conclusion somewhere between the extreme view of Professor Jordan (Philanthropy in England,[London, ], 51) that ‘it was Cited by:   APART from Simon Roffey’s Chantry Chapels invery little has appeared on chantries in England since G.

Cook’s ground-breaking publication Mediaeval Chantries and Chantry Chapels in ; so a more detailed study of the system of paying for praying for salvation, based on the archival re­pository at St Paul’s Cathedral, is to be. Although many chapels were lost at the Reformation, when chantries were dissolved by the Chantries Act ofsome new chapels have been dedicated within churches and cathedrals in modern times, in some cases as memorials to war dead.

Cook, G.H., Mediaeval Chantries and Chantry Chapels (rev. edn. [91] Cook’s reference to the domestic tourist (G.H. Cook, Mediaeval Chantries and Chantry Chapels [London: J.M.

Dent & Sons Ltd., ], xi) was in keeping with several other books published on medieval churches before and after the war; see Harry Batsford and Charles Fry, The Greater English Church, 2nd ed.

(London: B.T. Batsford Ltd.,   Sources. Athena-like, the stone-cage chantry chapel appeared fully formed in the late fourteenth century. Its essential components were established with its earliest extant example, Bishop Edington’s chapel at Winchester, in which a pair of stone traceried screens, erected c.

spanned the opening between two piers in the nave’s south arcade. Chantry chapel synonyms, Chantry chapel pronunciation, Chantry chapel translation, English dictionary definition of Chantry chapel.

chantries Ecclesiastical 1. The Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin built by the townspeople of Wakefield in the mid 14 century as an integral part of Wakefield's new stone bridge (which replaced earlier wooden bridges) across the River Calder.

the first licensed in It is one of only three surviving bridge chantries in the country. A bridge chapel is a small place of Christian worship, built either on, or immediately adjacent to, a road bridge; they were commonly established during pre-Reformation mediaeval era in Europe.

Although sometimes built on land at the very start of the bridge, bridge chapels were often built into the bridge structure itself, usually on one of the piers which had been made especially. Define chantries.

chantries synonyms, chantries pronunciation, chantries translation, English dictionary definition of chantries. chantries Ecclesiastical 1. An April conference at Oxford explored chantries and chantry chapels as vehicles of religious, social, and architectural expression.

The medieval chantry in England. The Trinity Chapel () and the later Founders Chapel () are both chantry chapels - church spaces dedicated to masses for the founder's soul - a common feature of the 14th century, presumably as a response to the Black Death that advanced through Britain and in particular through the gates of Gloucester between and.

William Wyggeston's chantry house, built aroundin Leicester: the building housed two priests, who served at a chantry chapel in the nearby St Mary de Castro church. It was sold as a private dwelling after the dissolution of the chantries.

Following the Reformation in England initiated by King Henry VIII, Parliament passed an Act in which defined chantries as .Over in Wakefield at the Chantry Chapel for a @bodyswakefield concert with Jamie from @, and @meursaultmusic @ Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin, Wakefield Antony Barnes added a new photo — at Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin, Wakefield.4/5(23).Location.

As many chantry chapels and manorial chapels were situated at the east end (closest to the holy city of Jerusalem) of the north or south aisles, next to the chancel, frequently they lay within the area enclosed by the chancel screen.

Function. The parclose screen is designed to restrict physical access to those unauthorised to enter, yet still to allow a good view into the.